` Oceana Fishery Audit 2019

CATCH MONITORING INDICATORS:
NATIONAL POLICY LONG OVERDUE

Most of Canada’s marine fish and invertebrate stocks have some catch-monitoring tools in place, and the public availability of more IFMPs has allowed a better assessment of the tools used and the coverage levels targeted.

There are three main catch-monitoring tools used in Canada: logbooks, at-sea monitoring or dockside monitoring. Each has a different purpose, and not all fisheries require 100 per cent coverage with each tool. Tracking catch allows managers to figure out important fishery statistics, such as how many of each species are caught. It also reveals whether harvesters are following the rules.

It is difficult to know what monitoring levels are being achieved and whether these are adequate to reach catch-monitoring objectives (in cases where objectives exist). DFO must complete and implement its National Fishery Monitoring Policy to guide the selection of monitoring tools, the level of monitoring required and the establishment of monitoring objectives.

Stocks with fisheries that have catch monitoring in place

Purpose: Help prevent overfishing, control bycatch and collect scientific information for stock assessments.

At-sea or electronic monitoring

2017
71.1%
2018
71.1%
2019

At-sea or electronic monitoring with 100% coverage

2017
21.1%
2018
21.1%
2019

Mandatory logbooks

2017
82.5%
2018
83%
2019

Mandatory logbooks that record the entire catch

2017
21.6%
2018
26.8%
2019

GOVERNMENT COMMITMENT:

Canada is still waiting for the National Fishery Monitoring Policy, originally slated for 2017, to be finalized and implemented.

Independent dockside monitoring

2017
74.2%
2018
75.8%
2019

Independent dockside monitoring of 100% of landings

2017
40.2%
2018
44.8%
2019

In 2019, none of the index stocks had IFMPs that include specific catch-monitoring objectives. Oceana Canada strongly encourages DFO to require that specific, measurable catch-monitoring objectives be included in IFMPs.

Credit: Jason van Bruggen